Striving to remove barriers that prevent us from building Vibrant, Diverse, Inclusive, Accessible Communities!

 

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Words Matter - Use Blind or Low Vision as opposed to visually impaired

Michael Hingson, in a suit and tie, addresses an audience, standing at a podium.

In his insightful article "Words Matter," Michael Hingson delves into the significant impact language has on perceptions of people with sight loss. Drawing from his extensive experience with the National Federation of the Blind and his role as Chief Vision Officer at accessiBe, Hingson highlights the problems with the term "visually impaired." He argues that this terminology inaccurately suggests a visual deficiency and perpetuates the misconception that people with sight loss are less capable.

Hingson emphasizes that the Blindness Community widely advocates for the use of the term "blind or low vision" to more accurately describe people with varying degrees of sight loss. This phrase not only acknowledges the diversity within the sight loss community but also avoids implying any inferiority. By adopting "blind or low vision," we can challenge societal misconceptions and promote a more respectful and empowering narrative.

Ultimately, Hingson emphasizes the importance of self-advocacy and public education in fostering inclusive language. By raising awareness and encouraging the use of accurate terminology, we can create a society that values the capabilities and contributions of People with Disabilities. Striving to remove barriers that prevent us from building Vibrant, Diverse, Inclusive, Accessible Communities!
 

Read the full Article: Words Matter

by Michael Hingson

Striving to remove barriers that prevent us from building a Diverse, Vibrant, Inclusive, Accessible Community!

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