Striving to remove barriers that prevent us from building Vibrant, Diverse, Inclusive, Accessible Communities!

 

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I Worked Quite Well With My Disability. That Never Stopped Customers From Saying Wild Things To Me.

A young girl, Emily Tisshaw, is joyfully sitting on a ride-on toy. She is wearing a yellow shirt with pink overalls and has a band-aid on her leg. Emily, a Person with a Disability, has her left arm ending just below the elbow. She is smiling happily, reflecting her excitement as she enjoys the ride.

Emily Tisshaw's article, "I Worked Quite Well With My Disability. That Never Stopped Customers From Saying Wild Things To Me," offers a compelling insight into the daily barriers faced by a Person with a Disability in customer service. Born without a left hand, Emily has experienced a lifetime of stares and intrusive questions. Initially, she tried to hide her arm to avoid unwanted attention, but eventually chose to embrace her body and live confidently. Despite this, she still encounters shocking and misguided comments from customers under the guise of offering help.

Emily shares anecdotes that highlight the ableism she encounters regularly. From a customer insisting on sending a prayer for her "missing hand" to another doubting her managerial capabilities based on her appearance, these interactions underscore the patronizing attitudes People with Disabilities often face. Despite growing more comfortable with herself, Emily's narrative reveals the constant emotional labor required to navigate a world that frequently views her as less capable simply because of her disability.

Her experiences in customer service illustrate broader societal problems. Emily recounts instances where customers assumed she needed help without asking, such as the person who placed a box on a shelf for her or the one who hurriedly scanned groceries over her hand. These behaviors, while perhaps well-intentioned, reflect a fundamental lack of understanding and respect for her autonomy and dignity. Such actions perpetuate the stigma that People with Disabilities are inherently less capable.

Emily's story is a call to action for greater awareness and empathy. She advocates for viewing disabilities not as barriers but as opportunities to learn and experience the world differently. By sharing her journey and the problems she faces, Emily encourages others to see beyond their biases and assumptions. Her article is a compelling reminder of the importance of inclusivity and respect in all interactions, making it a must-read for anyone committed to striving to remove barriers that prevent us from building Vibrant, Diverse, Inclusive, Accessible Communities!

Read the Full Article: I Worked Quite Well With My Disability. That Never Stopped Customers From Saying Wild Things To Me.

By Emily Tisshaw
 

Striving to remove barriers that prevent us from building a Diverse, Vibrant, Inclusive, Accessible Community!

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